Prairie Yard & Garden: Growing Vegetables in the 1800s

Prairie Yard & Garden: Growing Vegetables in the 1800s

The Oliver Kelley Farm, located on the bluffs of the Mississippi River near Elk River, is an interpretive historical site that features an operational mid-1800 farmstead. One feature of the farm is a historic garden where pioneer women and children raised vegetables for the family. Host Larry Zilliox visits with Andrea Krist, a site interpreter from the Minnesota Historical Society, who educates guests on the raising and preserving of vegetables in the 1850s.

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38 Comments

  1. Linda Casey on July 13, 2019 at 2:08 pm

    Wonderful .. thank you

  2. DeliaLee8 on July 13, 2019 at 2:10 pm

    Andrea Krist is an excellent speaker/educator/interpreter! Really enjoyed this video!

  3. Power Sonic on July 13, 2019 at 2:11 pm

    This woman sound like she is speaking from memory , very knowledgeable and articulate . Very good video ..

  4. innovation HQ on July 13, 2019 at 2:13 pm

    To bad TV did not have more content like this instead of the garbage that most people watch.

  5. *Beansie* on July 13, 2019 at 2:14 pm

    I’m only 3 minutes in but I’m wondering why they are spending their time (a lot of it I’m sure) pulling weeds? And why is there SO much grass growth around their foods? Composting and permaculture methods, as well as the 3 sisters method was WELL known by the 1800’s by nearly every household. They seem to be making it harder than it needs to be. They need to introduce some companion flowers (again common knowledge by this time in history) and herbs into their plots to help them flourish. They’ve got a lovely piece of land to work, they could really regenerate that land if they put their minds to it.

  6. Linda Phillips on July 13, 2019 at 2:14 pm

    I love it. how did that coked how did they cook? what kind of stroke did they use in the 18 hundreds?

  7. Clint DeMuro on July 13, 2019 at 2:18 pm

    The host reminds me of Dr. Steve Brule.

  8. downbntout on July 13, 2019 at 2:20 pm

    Those crocks were beautiful.

  9. Dorothy cripplewing on July 13, 2019 at 2:20 pm

    this video was very informative ….thank you…Now one for the inside of the house the barn and wearing apparel would be lovely.

  10. Ginger Ludtke on July 13, 2019 at 2:21 pm

    I really enjoyed this- thank you!

  11. Susan Lee on July 13, 2019 at 2:27 pm

    Would sure like to try cucumber ketchup 😋

  12. NoneofBizor JuliejT on July 13, 2019 at 2:32 pm

    this was really informative I learned a lot thankyoi!

  13. Jennifer on July 13, 2019 at 2:32 pm

    I just found my dream job!

  14. Betsy Magnolia on July 13, 2019 at 2:36 pm

    That was great!

  15. Mr A on July 13, 2019 at 2:37 pm

    I am from the UK and my house was started 1838 and finished 1864. I’m starting to make a period garden and this video sure paints a contrasting image of the time! worth a visit i’m sure

  16. Community Surthriveal on July 13, 2019 at 2:38 pm

    Fantastic. How about a video on the cooking and baking of the produce?

  17. Petrea Mihai on July 13, 2019 at 2:38 pm

    To much bhla-bhla…

  18. Linda Phillips on July 13, 2019 at 2:41 pm

    I love it. how did that coked how did they cook? what kind of stroke did they use in the 18 hundreds?

  19. Sara Johnson on July 13, 2019 at 2:41 pm

    Pioneerpublic-  I’d love to use this video about Prairie Yard & Garden at our Norwegian Heritage Center in Stoughton, WI. We have an auditorium that visitors can watch selected videos on demand.  Is it possible for us to get a copy of this to use for public viewing in our Auditorium?   Here is the website to our heritage center: http://www.livsreise.org

  20. The Cleaning Lady on July 13, 2019 at 2:43 pm

    I’ve been there several times. It’s a great place to go, especially during threshing week or their Victorian wedding weekend. 🙂

  21. Tomsik Media & Production Company Micheal Tomsik on July 13, 2019 at 2:44 pm

    nice video, however volume isn’t good.

  22. Ordhaj on July 13, 2019 at 2:44 pm

    One of the most painful videos I have ever seen.

  23. Kaitlyn on July 13, 2019 at 2:44 pm

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  24. John Johnson on July 13, 2019 at 2:45 pm

    If your a lowlife puke like some of the people on the comments. Keep your opinion to yourselves

  25. Pamela Descoteaux on July 13, 2019 at 2:47 pm

    Informative but I couldn’t finish watching this video; she’s used the filler word "uhm" at least 200 times!

  26. Truelove on July 13, 2019 at 2:49 pm

    fermentation ….. salting…..dehydration…..grinding into flour……drying beans ……..brining …

  27. Linda Phillips on July 13, 2019 at 2:51 pm

    I love it. how did that coked how did they cook? what kind of stroke did they use in the 18 hundreds?

  28. Sue Mel1 on July 13, 2019 at 2:54 pm

    Wonderful video! Thanks so much for preserving our history!

  29. sue mcfarlane on July 13, 2019 at 2:56 pm

    Root crops also fed cattle through the winter when grain was costly or hard to grow

  30. Rondi Anderson on July 13, 2019 at 2:56 pm

    Love the video!

  31. Margaret Rustan on July 13, 2019 at 2:56 pm

    I would like to have her hat. Basically, aside from the clothes, our gardening in the 30s was pretty much the same. The cultivating of the soil was done by hand, as well as planting the seeds, the weeding, the harvesting. Our vegetable garden was laid out row by row…so many rows of peas, carrots, onions, string beans, cabbage, tomatoes, cucumbers, etc. We planted our potato eyes in mounds…usually 6 or 7 mounds. We always enjoyed fresh creamed baby potatoes and peas, We had a separate strawberry patch and our watermelon and cantaloup were grown alongside the big corn field. Lots of memories of great food. Come winter, the veggies we didn’t consume as they matured and didn’t can, we stored in bushel baskets of potatoes, carrots, onions and apples in our basement. Good food year round. I don’t miss the work but I do miss going into the garden and pulling up a carrot or two, wiping them on my britches and devouring them.

  32. Elizbietka on July 13, 2019 at 2:57 pm

    I absolutely agree about the aprons! I LOVE aprons! So handy and useful! We plant two large gardens (we live in ND, so the growing season is very short too), and do a lot of preserving come fall. We used to have a root cellar, but since it has fallen in, we just have a dark room where we keep a lot of our root vegetables. This room is kept monitored so that the temp doesn’t get too cold or too hot.

  33. Charlie Mijatovic on July 13, 2019 at 3:00 pm

    I was very surprised when she said most people aren’t familiar with rudabegas. Here in the UK we call them swedes and they’re very common in rural areas. They’re a very robust veggie and we add them to stews and soups, as well as mashing with carrot, roasting or (one of my favorites) roasting on the BBQ like a jacket potato.

  34. Troy Truchon on July 13, 2019 at 3:00 pm

    where can I find more info/seed about mangoing and the cucurbit mango variety? When I try to find more info on it I just find info on SE Asian green Mango (the tropical fruit) pickles

  35. Laura Pironi on July 13, 2019 at 3:04 pm

    I guess im the only one who wants to live like the 1800s after I get my own house..

  36. Natalie Sugar on July 13, 2019 at 3:05 pm

    Sorry I turned it off after the 9th minute her face scared me.

  37. brinbrin62 62200 on July 13, 2019 at 3:05 pm

    Funny. Salsifis are very common in France. Love this video.

  38. Linda Phillips on July 13, 2019 at 3:06 pm

    I love it. how did that coked how did they cook? what kind of stroke did they use in the 18 hundreds?

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